Congratulations Canada!

Congratulations Canada!

Canada Legalizes Recreational Cannabis Use

You did it Canada!  Showing the way for the rest of the world, you became the first major Western country to make marijuana legal, as it was always meant to be—for health, enlightenment and enjoyment.

What are the rules for my province?

Now you Canadians have to navigate the different rules about using weed in every province.  Each province has different rules on how much you can grow, where you can buy it and how old you have to be, among a myriad of other minuscule rules.

Soon as the smoke clears, we will give you a comprehensive table of all the rules and regulations and caveats that come with the territory (or province, as the case may be).

Meanwhile, there are two relatively comprehensive sources for provincial quirks including new penalties for violations.  Health Canada has an updated provincial list that is not comprehensive but is a starter.  Wikipedia has a more detailed list of provincial quirks, but needs a little updating so should be taken with a gram of whatever.

Update: Table of provincial laws now added.

Should you want to go into any of the finer details, we’ve included links to the relevant website for each province. We’ve also added links to each province’s online store, as they can be difficult to find on some of those government websites.

And below the table, you’ll find a few brief notes on the current and future state of the laws—when edibles are likely to be legal, for instance.

Canadian Cannabis Laws by Province

PROVINCEHOME GROWINGMINIMUM AGEWHERE TO BUYPUBLIC POSSESSION LIMITRESTRICTIONSPROVINCE WEBSITE
Alberta4 plants per household18+Private licensed stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No smoking in vehicles
- When carried in a vehicle, must be in closed packaging and out of reach of all occupants
- Some public consumption allowed (check restrictions)
Full details
British Columbia4 plants per household19+Govt. operated stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No smoking in vehicles
- Some public consumption allowed (check restrictions)
Full details
ManitobaNot allowed19+Private licensed stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption (including vehicles)
- When carried in a vehicle, must be out of reach of all occupants
Full details
New Brunswick4 plants per household (with some restrictions)19+Govt. operated stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption (including vehicles)
- At home, must be stored securely and inaccessible to minors
Full details
Newfoundland & Labrador4 plants per household19+Private licensed stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption (including vehicles)
- Drivers under 22, and commercial or novice drivers not permitted any trace of THC in their body
- When carried in a vehicle, must be in sealed packaging or out of reach of all occupants
Full details
Northwest Territories4 plants per household19+Govt. operated stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - Some public consumption allowed (check restrictions)
- No smoking in vehicles
- Drivers under 22, and commercial or novice drivers not permitted any trace of THC in their body
- When carried in a vehicle, must be in closed packaging and out of reach of all occupants
Full details
Nova Scotia4 plants per household19+Govt. operated stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption (including vehicles)
- When carried in a vehicle, must be in sealed packaging and out of reach of all occupants
- At home, must be stored securely and inaccessible to minors
Full details
Nunavut4 plants per household19+Online only until 2019 (licensed establishments to follow later) Buy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption (including vehicles)
- When carried in a vehicle, must be out of reach of all occupants
Full details
Ontario4 plants per household19+Govt. operated online storeBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - Public consumption allowed where tobacco can be smoked
- No smoking in vehicles
- Drivers under 21, and commercial or novice drivers not permitted any trace of THC in their body
Full details
Prince Edward Island4 plants per household19+Govt. operated stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption at present (including vehicles), but some designated spaces may be allowed at a later date
- When carried in a vehicle, must be in sealed packaging or inaccessible to all occupants
Full details
QuebecNot allowed18+Govt. operated stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams in public

(Possession of up to 150 grams allowed in a private place, but may only store max. 150 grams per private residence)
- Some public consumption allowed (check restrictions)
- No smoking in vehicles
- At home, must be stored securely and inaccessible to minors
Full details
Saskatchewan4 plants per household19+Private licensed stores and onlineBuy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption (including vehicles)
- Drivers under 21, and commercial or novice drivers not permitted any trace of THC in their body
Full details
Yukon4 plants per household19+Govt. operated stores and online (private retail stores will follow)Buy or carry max. of 30 grams - No public consumption (including vehicles)
- At home, must be stored securely and inaccessible to minors
- will be introduced for retail staff and licensees
Full details
Information correct as of 19th October 2018

Some general notes

At present, no province allows the sale of edibles, as federal regulations for this have yet to be finalized. However, sale of edibles should be legal eventually (October 2019 is the current target), though exact provincial laws may well vary.

Likewise, it’s worth pointing out that progress towards the final local legalization landscape is more advanced in some provinces than others. For example, Yukon is yet to license private retailers, but plans to; while in Nunavut, the province’s legislation also allows for the licensing and regulation of physical stores but sales are online only at present.

Broadly speaking, where public consumption is allowed, this mirrors the local laws on public consumption of tobacco—but sometimes with larger buffer zones around things like schools and play areas. Likewise, the list of where it’s not permitted is usually slightly longer. So make sure to check the province website.

By |2018-10-26T00:10:45+00:00October 18th, 2018|Miscellaneous|0 Comments

About the Author:

MaryJane Farmer is the nom de plume of the writers for 420Beginner and the avatar for our brand (kind of like the Betty Crocker of Weed.)

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